How does an offshore
windfarm work

How does an offshore windfarm work

Wind turbines generate electricity by capturing the natural power of the winds. The force of the wind rotates the turbine blades which spins a generator where kinetic energy (energy due to motion) is converted into electricity.

The electricity produced is then transmitted via cables through the inside of the tower to the seabed where the cables are buried or otherwise protected. Groups of turbines are linked together by submarine cables and each string of turbines is connected into an offshore substation.

A transformer within the offshore substation increases the electricity to a higher voltage to transmit the power produced towards the shore in an efficient manner. The offshore cables are connected to the onshore cables near the coast at what is called a transition joint bay (TJB) above the beach.

Underground onshore cables will carry the power from the TJB to an onshore substation where it is regulated and harmonised to meet the specifications required for connections into the national electrical transmission system. A short cable then connects the substation to the grid connection point where electricity enters the existing electricity network. Electricity is moved between substations by EirGrid and ESB Networks through overhead lines and underground cables to homes and businesses all over Ireland.

Wind turbines generate electricity by capturing the natural power of the winds. The force of the wind rotates the turbine blades which spins a generator where kinetic energy (energy due to motion) is converted into electricity.


The electricity produced is then transmitted via cables through the inside of the tower to the seabed where the cables are buried or otherwise protected. Groups of turbines are linked together by submarine cables and each string of turbines is connected into an offshore substation.


A transformer within the offshore substation increases the electricity to a higher voltage to transmit the power produced towards the shore in an efficient manner. The offshore cables are connected to the onshore cables near the coast at what is called a transition joint bay (TJB) above the beach.


Underground onshore cables will carry the power from the TJB to an onshore substation where it is regulated and harmonised to meet the specifications required for connections into the national electrical transmission system. A short cable then connects the substation to the grid connection point where electricity enters the existing electricity network. Electricity is moved between substations by EirGrid and ESB Networks through overhead lines and underground cables to homes and businesses all over Ireland.

Dublin Array Windfarm